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Dean Kirkland

Vintage Portland

http://vintageportland.wordpress.com/

Located in Portland

Last update: November 25th, 2013 at 06:17 am

ping: http://ignoregon.com/ping/1922

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A photo blog exploring Portland's past through historical images.

The Vintage Portland staff is taking Thanksgiving week off. We’ve recently passed our four-year anniversary with almost 1,000 entries so we’ll be back next week refreshed and ready to go again. Enjoy!Filed under: Uncategorized

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Just an absolutely brilliant photo of the Ross Island Bridge under construction. The view is to the northeast as the main span girders are joined in the middle. Although it’s mystifyingly dated 1937 on the front, this is almost certainly 1926, as the bridge opened in December of that year.  (City of Portland Archive

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Our Number Man finds himself standing on the sunny corner of NE Union Avenue & Russell Street in 1929. The same building can be seen down the street in this previous post. (City of Portland Archives)Filed under: 1920s, Northeast, Number Man, Russell Street, Union Avenue

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This scene along SE 28th Avenue near Eastmoreland shouldn’t be too far from our previous photo along 28th. The white house in the distance on the right may be at SE Schiller Street. (City of Portland Archives)Filed under: 1920s, Southeast

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SE Foster Road west from 66th Avenue presented a quaint and neighborly feel back in 1923. A laundry, barber, real estate office and ice cream were available here as people came out to chat or just catch a bit of sun. (City of Portland Archives)Filed under: 1920s, Foster Rd., Southeast

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This dapper gentleman struck a pose with his car in the Northwest industrial area of Portland in 1928. Although labeled as “NW 14th & Lovejoy,” this location could be open to debate. Is that a salesman’s sample case on the ground? (City of Portland Archives)Filed under: 1920s, Northwest, Number Man, P

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Our Number Man probably indicates that an East Burnside street widening project is not too far in the future. The business names have changed at the intersection with SE 14th Avenue but the buildings remain intact today. (City of Portland Archives)Filed under: 14th Avenue, 1920s, Burnside, Number Man, Southeast

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NE 82nd Avenue was little more than a rutted, single-lane path north of Sandy Blvd in 1928. A nice brick confectionery shop on the northeast corner and new construction on the northwest corner signaled future growth for the area. The patchwork paving on Sandy probably shows the dividing line between city property on the lef

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Mr. Olsen’s tidy watchmaking shop was at 734 Alberta Street in 1932. After the soon-to-follow street renumbering project, this became 2110 NE Alberta. The building still stands. (City of Portland Archives)Filed under: 1930s, Alberta Street, Northeast

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SW 10th Avenue was a two-way street in 1921. Here it passes in front of the 1913 Central Library on the right, looking south from Yamhill Street. (City of Portland Archives)Filed under: 10th Avenue, 1920s, Downtown, Streetcar, Yamhill Street

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Our Number Man is standing on the west side of NE Union Avenue in this circa 1929 photo. The building currently at 2225 NE MLK is probably the same building; it’s got some detailing updates but the basic structure of the building looks the same. (City of Portland Archives)Filed under: 1920s, Northeast, Number Man, Uni

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Just three blocks east on Morrison Street from yesterday’s feature, this grand home once stood. This looks northwest at the corner of 12th Avenue. (City of Portland Archives)Filed under: 12th Avenue, 1920s, Morrison Street, Southeast

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Automobile shops ruled the corner of West Burnside at Broadway in 1933. In fact automobiles were big business up and down Burnside at this time. This building is on the northwest corner; you can see a few trees in the North Park Blocks to the left. (City of Portland Archives) Filed under: 1930s, Broadway, Burnside, […

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The east end of Hayden Island is shown in this 1973 aerial photo where it meets Tomahawk Island, now joined together. Tomahawk Island was once named Sand Island and was the site of the Lotus Isle amusement park referenced in yesterday’s post. The pilings at bottom center are remnants of the bridge that joined Lotus [&

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Lotus Isle, the “Million Dollar Pleasure Paradise” was a short-lived amusement park on Tomahawk Island. Meant to compete with Jantzen Beach, the park, opened in 1930, was mismanaged and plagued by misfortune. A 1933 fire destroyed virtually all traces of the park. From the small Lotus Isle Park on the site today

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City crews work on the NW 10th Avenue ramp that lead from the old Lovejoy Street ramp down to street level. Both were removed in 1999 in a process that turned this former industrial/rail center into today’s Pearl District. (City of Portland Archives) Filed under: 10th Avenue, 1950s, Lovejoy Street, Northwest, Pearl, R

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The majestic St. Johns Bridge fades into the Oregon mist in this 1937 image. The view is to the east from on (or above) St. Helens Road. The remains of some of those pilings may still be in the river today. (City of Portland Archives) Filed under: 1930s, Bridge, Northwest

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The new Broadway Building on the northwest corner of SW Broadway and Morrison Street was highlighted in this full-page feature in The Oregonian, January 1, 1914. It’s now called the Pioneer Building. The “Gray’s” seen on the corner sign and in the windows refers to the former R.M. Gray men’s

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R.M. Gray was a men’s furnishings store at 273-275 Morrison Street in 1909. On the northeast corner of SW 4th and Morrison, the building is long gone, replaced by a full-block parking garage. Entering the street level shop where these doors once stood would lead you to some Buffalo Wild Wings today. (University of Ore

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Today’s South Waterfront area is trendy and expensive. Three-quarters of a century ago it was a huge expanse of Portland’s industrial waterfront. Schnitzer and Zidell, still big names in Portland industry, both got their starts here. The battleship USS Oregon was on display just south of the Hawthorne Bridge. (C

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It seems like very few of the street scenes we see here on Vintage Portland have wet, rainy streets. This is one of the exceptions, looking east on E Burnside at 39th Avenue on a dreary Winter day. While lush vegetation is one of the things that makes Portland so livable, it can make seeing […]

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A terrific view south on NW 6th Avenue where it crosses the pre-widened West Burnside in 1931. Lots of great signage and advertising in this photo, too. Both the Commonwealth and Arata buildings can be seen in these earlier photos. (City of Portland Archives) Filed under: 1930s, 6th Avenue, Burnside, Downtown, Northwest

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This could almost be mistaken for Tom McCall Waterfront Park today except SW Harbor Drive was still in place along the riverfront in this 1970 photo. Before the park was built this was just a grassy piece of land between Harbor Drive and Front Street on the left. (City of Portland Archives) Filed under: 1970s, […]

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A great view looking north up NE Union Avenue at Alberta Street. Auto-related businesses, a theater, drugstore and fountain and a business school give this place and time a great neighborhood feeling. No lack of utility poles and overhead wires either. (City of Portland Archives) Filed under: 1930s, Alberta Street, Northeas

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I believe the depression-era business lurking in the shadows on the northeast corner of NE 41st and Sandy is the Fred Meyer store. There’s a Rite-Aid in that location now, and I don’t think any of the houses up the west side of 41st exist either. (City of Portland Archives) Filed under: 1930s, Northeast, Sandy [

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The luxurious Carlton Hotel opened on SW Washington at 14th in 1911. This 1917 view is to the southwest, looking at the 14th and Burnside corner. This building was demolished for the stadium freeway which today passes under Burnside at this point. (City of Portland Archives) Filed under: 14th Avenue, 1910s, Building, Downto

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The Vintage Portland staff is taking a 9 day vacation May 18-27. Please continue to browse around and revisit old favorites or maybe find something you missed in over 850 entries of terrific old Portland images. Thanks for your continued support and we’ll see you after Memorial Day weekend! Filed under: Uncategorized

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This 1947 aerial photo covers a lot of area of Northeast Portland. From Burnside at the bottom, the view stretches out past Alameda Ridge in the distance. There’s some pretty good detail in the foreground, including Buckman Field Park, Benson Polytechnic High, Sullivan’s Gulch and the site of the future Lloyd Ce

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Hard to believe that somebody would build on the the lot on this corner due to the steepness of the slope. It would take almost a half-century but a single family home sits on the SW Montgomery Drive site just below where it meets SW Vista (beyond railing at top). It looks like Montgomery was […]

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There’s nothing particularly historic about this photo but it’s a classic mid-century American scene. If these two kids were standing here today, they’d be in their 60s and standing in the Rose Garden/Memorial Coliseum parking lot. Neither Cherry Street, nor Ross Avenue, just a house away to the right, exi

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