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Dean Kirkland

PaulingBlog

http://paulingblog.wordpress.com/

Located in Corvallis

Last update: June 20th, 2018 at 08:00 am

ping: http://ignoregon.com/ping/1070

7 post clicks in the past 90 days

Presented by the Oregon State University Libraries Special Collections & Archives Research Center

[Ed Note: With the conclusion of the academic year here at Oregon State University, we say goodbye to Student Archivist Ethan Heusser, who has written extensively on the Special Collections and Archives Research Center’s rare book collections at our sister blog, Rare@OSU. Today and over the next three weeks, we will s

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[Ed Note: This weekend is commencement weekend at Oregon State University, and to mark the occasion we thought we would look back at Graduation Day 1933 at Oregon State Agricultural College, a commencement exercise distinguished by Linus Pauling’s receipt of an honorary doctorate from his undergraduate alma mater.] Th

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[The seventh and final post in our series on Linus Pauling’s association with Stanford University.] In the wake of a series of heated and, at times, violent anti-war protests on and near campus, university president Richard W. Lyman moved to have tenured English professor H. Bruce Franklin dismissed from the Stanford

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[Part 6 of 7 in our series reviewing Linus Pauling’s years on faculty at Stanford University.] It should come as no surprise that, while at Stanford, Linus Pauling kept a close watch on political activism, both on and around campus. While much of the material that Pauling saved would suggest that he was mostly an [

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[An examination of Linus Pauling’s tenure at Stanford University. This is part 5 of 7.] Linus Pauling knew going into his appointment at Stanford University that grants and outside funding would of paramount importance to keeping his research afloat. In September 1972 – three years into his tenure – Paulin

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[Looking back on Pauling’s tenure at Stanford University. This is part 4 of 7.] While at Stanford, Pauling actively sought to make the best use that he could of the laboratory and computing equipment available on the campus. In June 1970, about a year after his arrival, Pauling wrote to Paul John Flory, then the [R

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[An examination of Linus Pauling’s years at Stanford University, part 3 of 7.] From the outset, Linus Pauling knew that his time at Stanford as a full professor would be short-lived. Hesitant from the beginning, Stanford had stipulated that Pauling’s contract go up for renewal every year and that his reappointme

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[An examination of Linus Pauling’s years at Stanford University. Part 2 of 7.] Linus Pauling began his appointment as Professor of Chemistry at Stanford University on July 1, 1969. During his years in Palo Alto, Pauling’s experimental work largely focused on developing and refining urine and breath analyses for

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[This is the first installation of a seven-part series examining Linus Pauling’s years at, and associations with, Stanford University.] Long before arriving at Stanford University as a professor, Linus Pauling had built a working relationship with the Stanford Research Institute through its branch office in Los Angele

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[An examination of Linus Pauling’s first paper on the nature of the chemical bond, published in April 1931. Part 2 of 2.] In 1928 the German physicists Walter Heitler and Fritz London published a paper that appeared to have beaten Linus Pauling to the punch in its application of quantum mechanics to the theory of [

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[An examination of Linus Pauling’s first paper on the nature of the chemical bond, published in April 1931. This is part 1 of 2.] “It seems to me that I have introduced into my work on the chemical bond a way of thinking that might not have been introduced by anyone else, at least not […]

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[Extracts from an interview by Tiah Edmunson-Morton with Chris Petersen, conducted on the occasion of the Pauling Blog’s tenth anniversary. This transcript has been lightly edited for clarity. Part 4 of 4.] Tiah Edmunson-Morton: Do you see yourself as his biographer? Chris Petersen: Oh no, definitely not. But here i

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[Extracts from an interview by Tiah Edmunson-Morton with Chris Petersen, conducted on the occasion of the Pauling Blog’s tenth anniversary. This transcript has been lightly edited for clarity. Part 3 of 4.] Tiah Edmunson-Morton: How many students have worked on the blog? Chris Petersen: Well, thirty-three people hav

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[Extracts from an interview by Tiah Edmunson-Morton with Chris Petersen, conducted on the occasion of the Pauling Blog’s tenth anniversary. This is part 2 of 4.] Chris Petersen: [Once the Pauling Blog had been launched in Spring 2008] it took us a little while to figure out what we were doing. The early posts are [

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[Over the next four weeks, the Pauling Blog will celebrate its tenth anniversary by sharing extracts from an oral history interview conducted with Chris Petersen, the founder, editor and publisher of the blog. This interview was led by Tiah Edmunson-Morton, who is an archivist and instructor, and also the curator of the Ore

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It’s hard to believe and even a bit overwhelming for us to think about, but ten years ago this week the Pauling Blog came into being. In the decade that followed, thirty-three people authored posts for the project, in the process compiling a body of work that now consists of over 664,000 words. Later this […]

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Today we mark the 117th anniversary of Linus Pauling’s birth, which took place in Portland, Oregon on February 28, 1901. At about this time last year, we sifted through and highlighted a collection of posts that we had published from 2010 to 2013, the idea being that relatively new readers might appreciate knowing abo

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On September 18, 1975, the determination of many sectors of the scientific community culminated in an early afternoon ceremony held in President Gerald Ford’s Oval Office. It was on this date that Linus Pauling at long last received the 1974 National Medal of Science, an award that was long in the coming. Immediately

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[Part 2 of 2] In the mid-1960s, as he continued to develop his close-packed spheron theory of atomic nuclei, Linus Pauling sought to use the techniques of creative visualization that had served him so well in his past theoretical work. The situation was trickier this time however, as the discipline of nuclear physics had no

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[Part 1 of 2] “I consider the polyspheron theory to be a simple statement about the insight into nuclear structure that is provided by the experimental data and to some extent by the quantum mechanical calculations.”  – Linus Pauling, 1976 In the early twentieth century, when physicists were gaining knowledge of the

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[An examination of “Ascorbic Acid and Cancer: A Review,” published in 1979. This is part 2 of 2.] Linus Pauling and Ewan Cameron began their paper “Ascorbic Acid and Cancer: A Review” – published with Brian Leibovitz in Cancer Research in March 1979 – by detailing the history of research

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[Ed Note: Today’s post is the first installment of a two-part look at Linus Pauling, Ewan Cameron and Brian Leibovitz’ extensive 1979 review of the published literature pertaining to research on ascorbic acid and cancer.] Students of Linus Pauling’s life will know full-well that Pauling expended significan

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[An examination of Linus and Ava Helen Pauling’s relationship with the influential Indian chemist, Asima Chatterjee. Part 2 of 2.] Asima Chatterjee’s one and only meeting with Linus and Ava Helen Pauling took place during the Paulings’ tour of India, which spanned the months of January and February 1967. D

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[Ed note: A Google Doodle published in September 2017 featured a name familiar to us — the groundbreaking Indian scientist Asima Chatterjee — and prompted us to investigate her story a bit more. Today’s post is the first of two reflecting on Chatterjee’s work and her long friendship with Linus and Av

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The Oregon State University Libraries Special Collections and Archives Research Center (SCARC) is pleased to announce that applications are once again being solicited for its Resident Scholar Program. Now in its eleventh year, the Resident Scholar Program provides research grants to scholars interested in conducting work

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[Our seventh and final post examining the history of Linus Pauling’s textbook, General Chemistry, first published in 1947. This is also our last post for 2017. Many thanks to you, our readers, for another great year! Look for us again in early January.] In 1979, Linus Pauling contacted his publisher, W.H. Freeman 

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[An examination of General Chemistry, published by Linus Pauling seventy years ago. This is part 6 of 7.] By the time that Linus Pauling was preparing to revise and publish a third edition of General Chemistry, the cast with which he had been working since the 1940s had shifted considerably. For one, publisher William H. F

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[An examination of General Chemistry, published by Linus Pauling seventy years ago. This is part 5 of 7.] General Chemistry has been translated into twelve languages, and most of the foreign editions of the text were published in the interim between the release of the U.S. second and third editions, 1953-1970. As Linus P

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[An examination of General Chemistry, published by Linus Pauling seventy years ago. This is part 4 of 7.] Linus Pauling and his publisher, William H. Freeman, were in the planning stages for a second edition of General Chemistry before the first edition had even hit the bookstores in 1947. Nonetheless, the second edition d

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[An examination of General Chemistry, published by Linus Pauling seventy years ago. This is part 3 of 7.] The first edition of Linus Pauling’s General Chemistry textbook was published by W.H. Freeman and Co. in August 1947, and almost immediately the comment cards poured in. The majority of the book’s reader

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