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Dean Kirkland

PaulingBlog

http://paulingblog.wordpress.com/

Located in Corvallis

Last update: June 17th, 2015 at 03:04 pm

ping: http://ignoregon.com/ping/1070

7 post clicks in the past 90 days

Presented by the Oregon State University Libraries Special Collections & Archives Research Center

Today we remember Dr. Alexander Rich, a student and colleague of Linus Pauling who passed away in April at the age of 90. Rich and Pauling were among the group of scientists who embarked on one of the most exciting scientific quests of the 20th century – the so-called “race for DNA.” Rich’s friends and colleagues

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[Continuing our examination of the culture of oratory at Oregon Agricultural College during Pauling’s undergraduate years. Part 2 of 2] This coming Saturday, Oregon State University will host its 146th commencement exercises.  As the campus buzzes with students finishing their finals and seniors looking forward to th

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[Post 1 of 2 focusing on the culture of oratory at Oregon Agricultural College during Pauling’s undergraduate years.] Early in the 20th century, Oregon Agricultural College (OAC) – the institution now known as Oregon State University – was in the midst of rapid expansion and development. As new buildings sprung up

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[Post 2 of 2 marking the centenary of Jerome Wiesner’s birth] When Linus Pauling traveled to Norway to receive the Nobel Peace Prize in December 1963, he stepped off the plane and was filled with indignance. At first he couldn’t be sure, but after a few minutes it was clear: contrary to well-established convent

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[Marking the one-hundredth anniversary of Jerome Wiesner’s (1915-1994) birth. Post 1 of 2] On May 25, 1961, President John F. Kennedy spoke at a joint session of Congress to request funds for sending an American to the moon. During his memorable speech, the president stated his belief “that this nation should

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[Part 5 of 5] Once his televised debate with Edward Teller was concluded, Linus Pauling stated that the two would never meet again in a format of this type, as Pauling “considered [Telller’s] debating methods improper.”  And though the two would indeed never again confront one another in public, tensions co

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[Part 4 of 5] In the months following their televised 1958 debate, Linus Pauling and Edward Teller both published books that they believed would serve to educate the public on the real dangers associated with atomic development and testing.  And though their formal debate had long since passed, both men continued to spa

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  [Part 3 of 5] An informed citizen is a good citizen.  This was a belief held by both Linus Pauling and Edward Teller.  As scientists the two likewise believed that the information they presented to the public must be specific and stripped of rhetoric. On the same token, it was also their obligation to spell [̷

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[Part 2 of 5] The debate over development versus disarmament of nuclear weapons was not black and white during the Cold War era. For both arguments pro and con, there existed many gray areas that both Edward Teller and Linus Pauling – standard bearers for pro and con respectively – wished to clarify for t

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[A detailed examination of the 1958 Pauling-Teller nuclear fallout debate. Post 1 of 5] Linus Pauling and the Hungarian-American Edward Teller were well-acquainted with one another, both because of their research backgrounds in quantum mechanics and because, by the late 1950s, each was commonly recognized to be one of A

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Happy Linus Pauling Day!  Today marks the 113th anniversary of Pauling’s birth and, as has become tradition here at the Pauling Blog, we celebrate with an announcement: the recipient of the 2014 Linus Pauling Legacy Award is Dr. Zia Mian. A physicist by training, Mian follows in the Pauling tradition through his deep

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Along with detective stories, crossword puzzles and the occasional walk, reading science fiction was Linus Pauling’s primary form of leisure.  The hundreds of dog eared sci-fi monthlies spanning multiple decades in his personal library (used to good effect by a past Resident Scholar of ours) are testament to a keen i

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[Guest post written by John Leavitt, Ph.D., Nerac, Inc., Tolland, CT.] In the fall of 1985, I went to a small meeting in Heidelberg, Germany, with Steve Burbeck from the Linus Pauling Institute of Science and Medicine, who had helped me by developing computerized microdensitometry to analyze two-dimensional protein profile

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[Ed Note: This is part one of a two part series of guest posts written by John Leavitt, Ph.D., Nerac, Inc., Tolland, CT.] There was an article about Linus Pauling in Time magazine in early 1981 about the fact that at the age of 80 he was still seeking a grant from the National Institutes of […]

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Since we’re in an announcing mood, it gives us great pleasure to pass along word of another new Pauling resource recently made available online by the Special Collections & Archives Research Center: a German-language edition of Robert Paradowski’s Pauling Chronology. Robert Paradowski’s chronology of

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We’re pleased to announce the addition of two more years to the ever-expanding Linus Pauling Day-by-Day project.  Now in its fifteenth year of production and growth, the website seeks to document as many days of Linus and Ava Helen Pauling’s lives as possible – painstaking work that has been carefully min

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[Part 2 of 2] Built in 1965, the R/V Alpha Helix, named after the protein structure discovered by Linus Pauling, had proven itself – over the course of two years and two voyages totaling 34,110 miles – to be a versatile research vessel. The National Science Foundation (NSF), which owned and had sponsored the con

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[Part 1 of 2] It was early 1966 when Linus Pauling received a letter informing him that a new research vessel had just been constructed in Washington state. The reason this was notable to Pauling was the vessel’s name – it was called the R/V Alpha Helix, named after a secondary structure of proteins that […

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The Oregon State University Libraries Special Collections & Archives Research Center (SCARC) is pleased to announce that applications are once again being solicited for its Resident Scholar Program. Now in its seventh year, the Resident Scholar Program provides research grants to scholars interested in conducting work

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We close out our posting schedule for the year on a melancholy note with this remembrance of the life of Emile Zuckerkandl, who passed away on November 9th at the age of 91. Zuckerkandl was born in Vienna, Austria on July 4, 1922. His family was of Jewish descent and active in the scientific, artistic, […]

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After the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies had passed, Linus and Ava Helen Pauling remained in Scandinavia into the New Year, visiting friends and making several public appearances in the region. In the wake of his prize, Pauling continued to speak on the importance of peaceful international relations and also addressed scienti

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On December 10th, 1963, Linus Pauling accepted the belated Nobel Peace Prize for 1962. Attended by the Norwegian royal family and various government representatives, the ceremonies took place in Festival Hall at the University of Oslo in Norway – separate, as per tradition, from the other Nobel Prize ceremonies in Sto

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While letters congratulating Linus Pauling for winning the 1962 Nobel Peace Prize continued to pour into his office early in December 1963, the debate in the press over whether Pauling deserved the Nobel had begun to cool down. Meanwhile, closer to home in southern California, friends and colleagues of Pauling and his wife

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Within the overarching saga of the race for DNA between Linus Pauling’s Caltech lab and Sir William Lawrence Bragg‘s Cambridge lab, the Cavendish, there existed a small yet interesting story of controversy and intrigue: the case of the coiled-coils. In August 1952, Linus Pauling visited England during the final

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Shannon Cram, a Ph. D. candidate in UC Berkeley’s Department of Geography, is the most recent individual to have completed a term as Resident Scholar in the OSU Libraries Special Collections & Archives Research Center.  She is also the latest of many long-term researchers to dig deeply into our wealth of collecti

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[Examining Pauling's activities in November 1963, Part 2 of 2] Away from the stress of managing his public image, Pauling’s response to the flood of supportive letters that he received was one of gratitude as he recognized that he would not have won the Nobel Peace Prize without the work of many others around the [

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[Examining Pauling's activities in November 1963 as he prepared to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. Part 1 of 2] The controversy stirred up by the October 25th Life magazine editorial, “A Weird Insult from Norway,” which criticized the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize for 1962 to Linus Pauling, continued throughout Novem

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On October 10th, 1963, the Limited Test Ban Treaty came into effect, having been agreed to some two months prior by the United Kingdom, Soviet Union, and United States. On the same day, Linus Pauling received notice that he had belatedly won the 1962 Nobel Peace. To commemorate the 50th anniversary of these events, the [

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Recently the blog took a field trip a few miles up I-5 to North Salem High School, where Ava Helen Pauling was inducted into the school’s hall of fame.  A grand old building dedicated in 1937, the current school is not at the same location as the facility where Ava Helen spent her high school […]

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[Part 3 of 3] On March 31, 1951, Linus Pauling and numerous associates published seven revolutionary papers in a single issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. The research had been funded by the Rockefeller Foundation and carried out at the Gates and Crellin Laboratories of Chemistry, at Caltech. The f

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